Game: a boy and his blob (Wii)

The format/developer/publisher: Nintendo Wii, developed by Wayforward, published by Majesco Entertainment

The ten-word synopsis: Boy helps adorable alien blob get home using magic jellybeans.

Games boxes are cold and hard. Hugging a game box, especially the sleek, white Wii ones, is not entirely comfortable. However, seeing as it is unfortunately impossible to embrace a boy and his blob (The name doesn’t use any capital letters, that’s not me being lazy) in any other way, it’ll have to do. Wayforward’s adorable little jellybean-based puzzle-platformer is a game you just want to reach out and hug at warmly as you can. Continue reading

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Film: Paranormal Activity 4

The cast/crew bit: diected by Henry Joost & Ariel Schulman, starring Kathyrn Newton, Matt Shiverly & Katie Featherson

The ten-word synopsis: More quiet-quiet-quiet-quiet-quiet-quiet-quiet-BANG nonsense.

If you were woken by an alarm clock this morning, then you’ve pretty much already experienced Paranormal Activity 4 today. A long period of nothing happening, followed by a loud noise that may startle you, but more than likely just makes you grumble as you turn over and hope it goes away.

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Film: Liberal Arts

The cast/crew bit: written & directed by Josh Radnor, starring Josh Radnor & Elizabeth Olsen

The ten-word synopsis: 30-something goes back to University; falls for 19-year old.

There’s a central theme running through Liberal Arts of whether or not something is worth reading just because you like it. This stems from an argument between our two leads over whether Zibby (Elizabeth Olsen) was justified in her reading of an unnamed vampire romantic fiction (Read: Twilight) just because she enjoyed it. While Josh Radnors’ character, Jesse, argues otherwise, (Prompting a wonderful line that all but instigates the grandest of debates: Twilight or Chaucer?) Liberal Arts is a fine example of Zibby’s point. If everybody enjoys the film just as much as I did, it’s certainly worth seeing. Continue reading

TV: Doctor Who – Series Seven, Part One

The cast/crew bit: written by Steven Moffat, Chris Chibnal & Toby Whithouse, starring Matt Smith, Karen Gillan & Arthur Darvill

The ten-word synopsis: The Doctors’ final few adventures with the moving-on Ponds.

Amy Pond is the longest-serving Doctor Who companion ever. Her 33 stories trumps the 22 of both Jamie McCrimmon and Rose Tyler, with her husband, Rory Williams, actually being her next-closest competition on 27. As such, it was always going to take a brave man to write them out, and a great man to do them justice. Thankfully, Steven Moffat is that man, and delivers a satisfying 5-episode ‘Goodbye’ to the Ponds with some aplomb. Continue reading

Film: Following

The cast/crew bit: written & directed by Christopher Nolan, starring Jeremy Theobauld and Alex Haw

The ten-word synopsis: Writer who follows people for material gets involved in dodginess.

In 1996, a young man called Christopher Nolan, who made a living by producing corporate training videos, set out with the aim of making a feature film. Having written a script inspired by a robbery that happened to him not too long beforehand, he roped in a friend, with whom he had previous made a short film, and his girlfriend, and a couple of others he knew, to help. 15 years later, this man is one of the most successful movie directors on the planet, both critically and commercially. Continue reading

Game: Picross E

The format/developer/publisher bit: Nintendo 3DS (Digital download), developed by Jupiter, published by Nintendo

The ten-word synopsis: It’s just some new puzzles for those addicted to Picross.

Two glances at the screenshot above and I’ve already solved that puzzle. I couldn’t simply look at it as a picture. Instead, it’s a challenge. It’s Picross challenging me. There’s no two ways about it: I’m an addict. I’m a Picross addict. And I’m proud of it. Continue reading

Film: The Perks of Being a Wallflower

The cast/crew bit: written & directed by Stephen Chbosky, starring Logan Lerman, Emma Watson & Ezra Miller

The ten-word synopsis: Sad, lonely teenager makes friends. Angst by the bucketload ensures.

You can tell a lot about a film by it’s choice of Smiths song on the soundtrack. Shaun of the Dead goes for Panic- a jaunty but heartfelt piece, a bit of a rush, with contrasts rife throughout, with elements that logic dictates shouldn’t slot together instead melding wonderfully. (500) Days of Summer picks There is a Light That Never Goes Out. Passionate, tragic and yet oddly upbeat and charming. The Perks of Being a Wallflower plumps for Asleep- perhaps the musical embodiment of the depressing reputation that Morrissey, Marr & co have garnered over the years. Continue reading